Joel Osteen

Joel Osteen and Terry

Ben Henderson

Ben Henderson and Terry

Ajay Goel

Ajay Goel, Cheryl Myers, and Terry

Holly Lucille

Terry and Holly Lucille

Terry and senator Hatch

Senator Hatch and Terry

Terry And Marilu

Terry & Marilu Henner

Terry And Gray

Dr. Gray & Terry

Terry receives Vity Award

Terry receives Vity Award

Buddy and Bella

Buddy and Bella

Buddy and Bella

Buddy and Bella

Buddy and Bella

Buddy and Bella

Terry on Tour

Terry on Tour

Terry on Tour

Terry on Tour

Terry on Tour

Terry on Tour

Terry at Marlene's - Federal Way

Terry at Marlene's - Federal Way

Soho, FL - 12/2011

Soho, FL - 12/2011

| Share

Search

Weekly Articles

Hibiscus and Cranberry Cut the Incidence of Urinary Tract Infections (UTI) by over 77%

Send to a Friend Download a PDF

Urinary tract infection otherwise known as UTI is the general term given to infection that can occur throughout the urinary tract system. Urinary tract infections and cystitis are very widespread and an established public health concern. They are more frequent in women in the age to procreate than in men or they arise later in life. Urinary tract infections represent the second reason for consultations in infectious pathology after lung infections.

The treatment of urinary tract infections and cystitis requires generally an antibacterial, analgesic preparation and an angio-protective to eliminate germs responsible for the infection, to fight the pain of micturition but also to protect the walls of the bladder. But, these treatments have adverse effects notably by increasing risks of germ resistance. Urine can pass bacteria and pus before being treated. Urinary tract infection is sometimes accompanied by inflammation which is called cystitis that can also occur with or without infection being present. If one or both kidneys are involved, then the term used to describe this condition is nephritis. An autoimmune disease is an individuals’ own system attacking a certain area of the body. UTI is similar to this situation in the fact that bacteria which causes the UTI is usually the individual’s normal intestinal organisms that under certain circumstances are able to pass from the area around the anus into the urethra. The urethra is a tube connecting the bladder with the outside of the body so the bacteria can pass into the bladder. Whenever urinary tract infections occur they can be a persistent problem.

Unfortunately, because of the anatomy of a woman, women are more frequently affected with UTIs. However, men with an enlarged prostate can also experience urinary tract infection. Prostatitis or obstruction of the urethra by an enlarged prostate can lead to incomplete bladder emptying, therefore, increasing the risk of infection. This is quite common in older men. The risk of urinary tract infection is increased in people with kidney stones, spinal cord injury, suppressed immune systems such as AIDS and diabetes or others who take immunosuppressant medications. Again, because of the anatomy of the woman, if she is highly sexually active, it dramatically increases the risk of urinary tract infection. Urinating after intercourse appears to reduce the risk of urinary tract infection. Women who also use a diaphragm for birth control are at greater risk. Circumcised males are at greater risk than uncircumcised males.

But overall, men are less likely to have a urinary tract infection because their urethra, the tube from the bladder, is longer. A man’s urethra reaches the outside world in a dryer environment than a females’ and the fluid produced in the prostate can fight infection again reducing the risk of UTI. There may be special groups that we should be aware of that could experience urinary tract infection which is not common but cannot be ruled out, from very young infants to children of all ages. It would not be wise to treat with natural alternatives, an infant or young child with a potential urinary tract infection without first consulting a physician. The frequency of UTI affecting this age group is not common and there are special circumstances surrounding the occurrence of UTI. Hospitalized patients in nursing homes also can experience UTIs frequently. There is considerable evidence to support the use of polyphenols and organic acids of hibiscus sabdariffa for the prevention of urinary tract infections. Urinary Tract

Infections should not be taken lightly and left untreated.
Infections can cause major complications. Always seek the advice of your physician. You may discuss with your physician the following information on a new clinical study for UTI using an extract of hibiscus. Recent clinical studies using the innovative concept of hibiscus extract cut the incidence of urinary tract infections by 77% says the in vivo study conducted from January 2008 to July 2008. The double-blind versus placebo in vivo study has highly confirmed the urinary tract comfort improvement in 77% of the study participants. The study concerns 70-90 women from 18 to 55 years old having more than eight episodes per year. After 184 days results confirmed a very significant treatment versus placebo. The study was conducted using a very specific premium grade aqueous preparation of hibiscus sabdariffa containing acidic compounds which scientists believe acidify and deodorize the urine and protect against urinary infections as well as kidney disorders (formation of stones). It is now established that hibiscus sabdariffa contains compounds that inhibit and prevent the adhesion of E.coli which is the causal agent in 80-95% of the episodes of acute non-complicated cystitis. Candida albicans is also known as an important causal agent.

The compounds in hibiscus that are responsible for such an effect are known as calyces. The calyx contains substantial quantities of polyphenols, flavonoids, sambubioanthocyanidins, proanthocyanidins and chlorogenic acids which were reported by several studies to possess excellent antimicrobial activity against organisms like E. coli, Staphylococcus, Bacillus subtilis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa with similar activity to chloramphenicol. This activity may be due to the polyphenolic nature of the flavonoids as well as other ingredients (i.e. polysaccharides and a high concentration of simple organic acids).

Cranberry extract: cranberry has long been known for its medicinal value and uses. Cranberry is one of the most widely recognized medicinal herbs grown in the United States. It has more recently enjoyed its popularity because of its ability to support a healthy urinary tract. When using a high quality cranberry extract you can enjoy the following benefits; It is more productive to the urinary tract than 10-12 ounces of cranberry juice. With this high quality extract, it can promote urinary tract health with just a single dose per day. This superior extract possesses a bacterial anti-adherence factor known to decrease the risk of bladder and kidney infections. There have been dozens of scientific studies confirming the use and effectiveness for kidney and bladder infection. This combination of hibiscus and cranberry extracts has been proven to be highly effective with no side effects. One dose per day can be effective for both prevention and therapeutic benefits.

Using both cranberry and hibiscus in a formulation is far more effective than using either one by itself. This combination of cranberry and hibiscus is very effective for eliminating urinary tract infection and cystitis. Preliminary studies have indicated that urinary tract infections are reduced by 77%. I would recommend looking for a formulation that contains these two ingredients to increase your odds of eliminating and preventing urinary tract infections and cystitis. This formulation can also be used on an ongoing basis as a preventative and general maintenance of healthy urinary tract function.

Terry recommends products with these ingredients. Look for them at your local health food store.
Proprietary Complex 700 mg
Hibiscus (Hibiscus sabdariffa) Extract (25:1), Cranberry (Vaccinum macrocarpon) Extract (4:1), Cranberry (Vaccinum macrocarpon) Extract 30% proanthocyanidins

 

2 Responses to Hibiscus and Cranberry Cut the Incidence of Urinary Tract Infections (UTI) by over 77%

  1. Edith J. Baumann says:

    I would be very grateful for a suggestion as to where I could obtain this product: Hibiscus Extract (25:1), Cranberry (Vaccinum macrocarpon) Extract (4:1), etc.
    Since April I’ve had more UTI’s can I can count. Three weeks ago I had a “procedure”: cystoscopy, dilation, inspection of the kidneys(?). It lasted two week; then I had another attack. I’m quite desperate. Thank you very much.

  2. Destry says:

    At last, someone comes up with the “right” awsner!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>